Cytokines Interaction in Innate and Immunomodulator-Induced Radioprotection

  • R. Neta
  • J. J. Oppenheim
  • G. D. Ledney
  • T. J. MacVittie
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 71)

Abstract

Ionizing radiation is particularly damaging to lymphoid and hematopoietic tissues, leading to anemia and decreased resistance to opportunistic infections, often resulting in death (1). Enhancing host defenses to radiation by administration of immunostimulatory/inflammatory agents was shown several decades ago to also enhance survival (2,3). It is now known that virtually all of the pathophysiological effects elicited by such agents are mediated by cytokines, hormone-like polypeptides that transmit signals from one cell to another (4,5). These include pluripotent inflammatory cytokines, IL 1, TNF, LIF, and IL 6, hematopoietic growth factors (CSF’s), interferons, as well as immunosupressive TGFβ. IL 1 and TNF have emerged as particularly important mediators of host defenses. Thus, our earlier findings that these two cytokines can confer radioprotection (6,7) is consistent with their role in protecting the host from damaging environmental agents.

Keywords

Hydrogen Peroxide Cage Leukemia Superoxide Anemia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Neta
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. J. Oppenheim
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. D. Ledney
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. J. MacVittie
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular ImmunoregulationBRMP, FCRFFrederickUSA
  2. 2.Department of Experimental HematologyAFRRIBethesdaUSA

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