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Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in the Diabetic Heart: Myocardial Tolerance During Surgery and Late Result

  • M. Sunamori
  • T. Maruyama
  • J. Amano
  • H. Tanaka
  • H. Fujiwara
  • T. Sakamoto
  • A. Suzuki
Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 130)

Abstract

It has been known that diabetic mellitus (DM) is listed as one of the risk factors in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). DM affects the coronary artery and arterioles to aggravate atherosclerotic lesions and result in impairment of cardiac function. In this regard, DM is responsible for late bypass graft patency and intra-operative surgical problems with respect to graftability of the coronary artery, completeness of coronary artery revascularization or myocardial tolerance to intra-operative ischemic insult. Further clinical characteristics on CABG for DM is aggravation of DM stimulated by surgical stress and increase in post-operative complication. Thus, we reviewed our clinical experience on CABG for the patients with DM with respect to perioperative ischemic tolerance and late surgical result.

Keywords

Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Diabetic Heart Coronary Artery Surgery Hemodynamic Alteration Graft Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Sunamori
    • 1
  • T. Maruyama
    • 1
  • J. Amano
    • 1
  • H. Tanaka
    • 1
  • H. Fujiwara
    • 1
  • T. Sakamoto
    • 1
  • A. Suzuki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Thoracic-Cardiovascular SurgeryTokyo Medical and Dental University, School of MedicineYushima, Bunkyo-ku, TokyoJapan

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