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Antinutritional Effects of Condensed and Hydrolyzable Tannins

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Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC,volume 59)

Abstract

Despite major structural differences, hydrolyzable and condensed tannins often produce similar antinutritional effects. The most common effects are diminished weight gains and lowered efficiency of nutrient utilization. The major biochemical basis for these effects appears not to be inhibition of dietary protein digestion but rather a systemic inhibition of the metabolism of digested and absorbed nutrients, particularly protein. In the case of condensed tannins, this inhibition is probably not due to polymeric tannin molecules, which are not absorbed from the digestive tract, but to associated lower MW poly phenols, which are readily absorbed.

Keywords

  • Gallic Acid
  • Condensed Tannin
  • Hydrolyzable Tannin
  • Ileal Digesta
  • Major Structural Difference

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Butler, L.G. (1992). Antinutritional Effects of Condensed and Hydrolyzable Tannins. In: Hemingway, R.W., Laks, P.E. (eds) Plant Polyphenols. Basic Life Sciences, vol 59. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-3476-1_40

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-3476-1_40

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