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Studies of Reovirus Pathogenesis Reveal Potential Sites for Antiviral Intervention

  • Bernard N. Fields
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 312)

Summary

Pathogenesis studies in animals can uncover details concerning viral replication, growth, and access to target organs, in vivo. This, in turn, reveals opportunities for antiviral intervention that may be otherwise missed by limiting analysis to growth of virus in tissue culture. In this report, reovirus infection of mice is used as a model. Three general aspects of reovirus behavior in mice are presented and each demonstrates a property of the virus that could easily have been missed by studies in tissue culture.

Keywords

Sciatic Nerve Hind Limb Enteric Virus Neurotropic Virus Fast Axonal Transport 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernard N. Fields
    • 1
  1. 1.Harvard Medical SchoolUSA

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