Role of Serotonin in Traumatic Brain Injury: An Experimental Study in the Rat

  • Hari Shanker Sharma
  • Jorge Cervos-Navarro
  • Georg Gosztonyi
  • Prasanta Kumar Dey

Abstract

Edema is a serious complication in many brain diseases including traumatic injury. The pathogenesis of traumatic brain edema is complex and includes physical destruction of microvessels, microcirculatory alterations in and around the primary injury and permeability changes of the vessel walls leading to a leakage of plasma constituents into the tissue (Long 1990, Reulen et al 1990). There are reasons to believe that many of these events are influenced by a number of chemical mediators which are released or become activated in and around the primary lesion like biogenic amines, arachidonic acid, leucotrienes, histamine and free radicals (Wahl et al 1988).

Keywords

Permeability Catheter Ischemia Albumin Serotonin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hari Shanker Sharma
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jorge Cervos-Navarro
    • 1
  • Georg Gosztonyi
    • 1
  • Prasanta Kumar Dey
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of NeuropathologyFree University BerlinGermany
  2. 2.Neurophysiology Research Unit, Department of PhysiologyInstitiute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu UniversityVaranasiIndia

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