Comparison of Pressure Support Ventilation (PSV) and Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation (IMV) during Weaning in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure

  • F. Esen
  • T. Denkel
  • L. Telci
  • J. Kesecioglu
  • A. S. Tütüncü
  • K. Akpir
  • B. Lachmann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 317)

Abstract

Certain groups of mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory failure are difficult to wean from prolonged ventilation despite advanced respiratory support techniques. The common modes for providing support during weaning are intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV), and spontaneous ventilatory trial (SVT) techniques; such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and T-piece. Weaning is often initiated with IMV, and a series of SVTs are introduced as the patient tolerates decreasing rates of IMV. However, there is some concern that this strategy of weaning may not be optimal for patient comfort, and muscle reconditioning [1].

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Esen
    • 1
  • T. Denkel
    • 1
  • L. Telci
    • 1
  • J. Kesecioglu
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. S. Tütüncü
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Akpir
    • 1
  • B. Lachmann
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of IstanbulIstanbulTurkey
  2. 2.Department of AnesthesiologyErasmus University and Academic Hospital DijkzigtRotterdamThe Netherlands

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