Multi-Scale Communication by Vertebrates

  • David E. Bain

Abstract

This paper presents a theoretical model for the evolution of the structure of many vertebrate communication signals. This model integrates recent advances in neurophysiology with generalizations developed about the structure of communication signals. The model is expected to apply to vertebrate signals in which the size of the signaler is important.

Keywords

Migration Retina Beach Sine Nism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • David E. Bain
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Marine World FoundationVallejoUSA
  2. 2.University of CaliforniaSanta CruzUSA

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