Advertisement

Effect of Hyperventilation on Oxygenation of the Brain Cortex of Neonates

  • David F. Wilson
  • Anna Pastuszko
  • Roy Schneiderman
  • Jane E. DiGiacomo
  • Marek Pawlowski
  • Maria Delivoria-Papadopoulos
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 316)

Abstract

It is well known that even brief periods of hypoxia lead to serious disruption of neural function. Neuronal properties are modified within seconds of the onset of anoxia and within 2.5-3 minutes anoxic depolarization begins (see for example Silver, 1977a,b), characterized by massive loss of K+ and diffusion of C1- into the cells. If reoxygenation occurs within a few minutes the cellular events and integrated neural function recovers, but as the period of oxygen deprivation is extended there is progressive irreversible loss of function.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Oxygen Pressure Ventilation Rate Newborn Piglet Phosphorescence Lifetime 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Clark, L.C., Misrahy, G., and Fox, R.P. (1958) Chronically implanted polarographic electrodes, J. Appl. Physiol. 13: 85–91.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Hall, R.T., Kulkarni, P.B., Sheehan, M.B., and Rhodes, P.G. (1980) Cerebrospinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase in infants with perinatal asphixia, Dev. Med. Child Neurol. 22: 300–307.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Kennealy, J.A., McLennan, J.E., Loudon, R.G., and McLaurin, R.L (1980) Hyperventilation-induced cerebral hypoxia, Amer. Rev. Res. Dis. 122: 407–412.Google Scholar
  4. Kety, S.S. and Schmidt, C.F. (1946) The effects of active and passive hyperventilation on cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen consumption, cardiac output, and blood pressure of normal young men, J. Clin. Invest. 25: 107–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Reivich, M. (1964) Arterial PCO2 and cerebral hemodynamics, Am. J. Physiol. 206: 25–35.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Lou, H.C., Lassen, N.A., and Friis-Hansen, B. (1979a) Management of interstitial emphysema by high-frequency low positive pressure hand ventilation in the neonate, J. Pediatr. 94: 118–121.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Lou, H.C., Skov, H., Pedersen, H. (1979b) Low cerebral blood flow: a risk factor in the neonate, J. Pediatr. 95: 606–608.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Rumsey, W.L., Vanderkooi, J.M., and Wilson, D.F. (1989) Imaging of phosphorescence: a novel method for measuring oxygen distribution in perfused tissue, Science 241: 1649–1651.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Silver, I.A. (1977a) Changes in PO2 and ion fluxes in cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, Adv. Exptl. Med. Biol. 77: 325–334.Google Scholar
  10. Silver, I.A. (1977b) Ion fluxes in hypoxic tissues, Microvascular Res. 13: 409–420.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Vanderkooi, J.M., Maniara, G., Green, T.J. and Wilson, D.F. (1987) J. Biol Chem. 262: 5476–5482.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Wilson, D.F., Rumsey, W.L., Green, T.J., and Vanderkooi, J.M. (1988) The oxygen dependence of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation measured by a new optical method for measuring oxygen concentration, J. Biol Chem. 263: 2712–2718.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • David F. Wilson
    • 1
  • Anna Pastuszko
    • 1
  • Roy Schneiderman
    • 1
  • Jane E. DiGiacomo
    • 1
  • Marek Pawlowski
    • 1
  • Maria Delivoria-Papadopoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Physiology and of Pediatrics Medical SchoolUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

Personalised recommendations