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Photothrombosis in Rabbit Brain Cortex: Follow up by Continuous pO2 Measurement

  • Koen van Rossem
  • Herman Vermariën
  • Karin Decuyper
  • René Bourgain
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 316)

Abstract

Continuous recording of changes in local pO2 during and after brain infarction in surviving animals which can be followed for months or years, may provide interesting information concerning pathophysiology and treatment of stroke and thrombosis. We performed such measurements before, during and till 4 weeks after photochemical induction of a cerebrocortical infarction in three rabbits.

Rose bengal - a photosensitive dye which sticks to endothelial cells and gives rise to endothelial damage and thrombosis when illuminated - was injected intravenously. After injection, a circular area (diameter 3 mm) of the brain cortex was illuminated using an optic fiber conducting light from a halogen lamp, whether or not filtered by heat and colour filters.

In order to enable pO2 measurement in and near the infarct zone, we constructed a transparent plastic frame in which pO2 electrodes were fixed beneath and 1 mm besides a shaft permitting mounting of the optic fiber. A black adhesive ring (inner diameter 3 mm) was attached to the bottom of the frame providing a perfectly demarcated illumination area. After fixation the electrodes were calibrated and the frame was implanted in the rabbit’s skull.

Ten days later an infarction was induced; pO2 was monitored continuously before, during and till 4 hours after this induction. Furthermore, pO2 was recorded 24 hours, 48 hours, 5 days, 14 days and 4 weeks after infarction.

Parameters describing the time course of pO2 were determined. In the illuminated area pO2 decreased after a certain latency time to reach a very low level, probably zero level, where it remained for at least 24 hours. Gradually, recovery was observed during the following days, and four weeks after infarction both level and pattern of electrode current appeared to be normal again. In the border zone pO2 decreased but did not reach zero level. Recovery was observed earlier than in the illuminated area.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Slow Variation Border Zone Black Ring Rose Bengal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koen van Rossem
    • 1
  • Herman Vermariën
    • 1
  • Karin Decuyper
    • 1
  • René Bourgain
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Physiology and PhysiopathologyUniversity of Brussels VUBBrusselsBelgium

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