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Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cells: Evolution During in Vitro Myogenesis

  • Christian Cognard
  • Bruno Constantin
  • Michèle Rivet
  • Nathalie Imbert
  • Colette Besse
  • Guy Raymond
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 311)

Abstract

The fusion of mononucleated myoblasts into multinucleated myotubes is a crucial event during myogenesis since it precedes (without being a prerequisite) the appearance of a lot of molecules and processes vital for the cell: T system formation and sarcotubular organization, contractile proteins arrangements, voltage-dependent calcium channels, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase, junctional nicotinic receptor (see reviews from Schneider and Olson, 1988; Nathanson, 1989). Therefore the study of events taking place before and after fusion will be of great importance for the understanding of mechanisms controlling the main function of muscle cells, that is contraction.

Keywords

Calcium Signal Calcium Current Calcium Transient Repetitive Pulse Caffeine Contracture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Cognard
    • 1
  • Bruno Constantin
    • 1
  • Michèle Rivet
    • 1
  • Nathalie Imbert
    • 1
  • Colette Besse
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guy Raymond
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of General PhysiologyCNRS URA 290Poitiers CedexFrance
  2. 2.S.U.M.E.B.Faculty of SciencesPoitiers CedexFrance

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