Hyaluronic Acid Promotes and Inhibits Angiogenesis

  • S. Kumar
  • P. Kumar
  • J. M. Ponting
  • A. Sattar
  • P. Rooney
  • D. Pye
  • R. D. Hunter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 227)

Abstract

Hyaluronic acid (HA) was first isolated nearly 50 years ago and is a ubiquitous component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) (Meyer and Palmer, 1934). From extrapolation of animal studies it has been estimated that an adult human contains approximately 15g HA, most of which is in skin. Remarkably, the total daily turnover of HA within the human body is in the region of several grams, of which only 0.3 mg is excreted via the kidneys (Laurent and Frazer, 1989). HA is a normal component of body fluids, its mean serum concentration is 50μg/litre and 2.5% of it is eliminated every minute. Interestingly the concentration of HA in lymph is 200-600 fold greater than in serum.

Keywords

Cellulose Migration Arthritis Polysaccharide Carboxyl 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Kumar
    • 1
  • P. Kumar
    • 1
  • J. M. Ponting
    • 1
  • A. Sattar
    • 1
  • P. Rooney
    • 1
  • D. Pye
    • 1
  • R. D. Hunter
    • 1
  1. 1.Christie HospitalManchesterEngland

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