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Focusing and Propagation of Proton Beam

  • Keishiro Niu

Abstract

It is the aim of this paper to design a fusion power plant whose electric output power is 1GW, and to find a way for breaking through fusion technically and energy-economically. Proton beams, whose total energy is 12MJ, pulse width is 30ns and beam number is 6, are chosen here as the energy driver. Because of low quality of proton beams, the target should be indirect driven and its radius should be large. The target with the radius of 8.7mm is the spherical cryogenic hollow one, which has double shells and five layers. The reactor has double solid walls. The inner wall rotates around the axis to induce a centrifugal acceleration. Flibe as the coolant protects the solid walls from damage and breezs tritium. The key technology of this power plant is for beam focusing and beam propagation. To suppress the beam divergence by the electrostatic force due to unneutralized proton charge, the simultaneous electron beam launching is proposed. When the excess electron beam current is -50kA, the induced magnetic field in the azimuthal direction confines the beam in the radius of 5mm, provided that the beam path is covered by the metal guide whose radius is lcm.

Keywords

Proton Beam Solid Wall Beam Propagation Power Supply System Electric Output Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keishiro Niu
    • 1
  1. 1.Teikyo University of Technology Uruido, Ichihara, ChibaJapan

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