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Exposure and Hazard Assessment Working Group

  • Erich W. Bretthauer
Part of the Nato · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 16)

Abstract

The efforts of the Exposure and Hazard Assessment Working Group were focused on the exchange of information on a variety of topics including research projects, regulations/statutes, analytical laboratories, and methods of exposure/risk assessment involving CDDs and CDFs. It was evident to the leaders of the Working Group that several of the knowledge voids had to be addressed on a fundamental level before expanded efforts could be made. Several questions needed to be answered:

Keywords

Hazardous Waste Linearize Multistage Model Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylase Chlorinate Dioxin International Information Exchange 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erich W. Bretthauer
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Environmental Protection AgencyUSA

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