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Overcoming barriers to the implementation of concurrent engineering

  • Gary A. Maddux
  • William E. Souder

Abstract

As organizations struggle to become more competitive in a global market-place, concurrent engineering has surfaced as one of many concepts that promises major benefits for its practitioners. Along with total quality management (TQM), quality function deployment (QFD), Hoshin kanri, kaizen, kanban, and a growing list of similar terminologies, concurrent engineering has both captivated and bewildered the world with its simplistic yet radical philosophy (Ouchi, 1981; Akoa, 1991). Its adoption and adaptation by an organization can have a profound effect. Users of concurrent engineering boast of better designs, fewer engineering changes, improved quality, improved marketability of products and increased profits (Hauser and Clausing, 1988; Winner, 1988; Maskell, 1991; US Army Material Command, 1991; Hartley, 1992). Why hasn’t everyone jumped on the concurrent engineering bandwagon?

Keywords

Design Team Quality Function Deployment Total Quality Management Statistical Process Control Concurrent Engineering 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary A. Maddux
  • William E. Souder

There are no affiliations available

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