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Influence of Mesoscale Circulations on Long-Range Transport in the Grand Canyon Area

  • R. A. Pielke
  • R. A. Stocker
  • G. S. Poulos
  • M. Uliasz
Part of the NATO Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 17)

Abstract

Using a climatological analysis scheme results are presented relating the relative contribution of long-range versus local pollution to visibility degradation in Grand Canyon National Park. Among the results, we demonstrate that the poorest visibility in the winter is generally associated with synoptic stagnation and/or transport of pollution from the northeast.

Keywords

Geostrophic Wind Synoptic Condition Grand Canyon Regional Atmospheric Modeling System National Weather Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Pielke
    • 1
  • R. A. Stocker
    • 2
  • G. S. Poulos
    • 1
  • M. Uliasz
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Atmospheric ScienceColorado State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA)Colorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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