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Testicular Gene Amplification and Impaired BCHE Transcription Induced in Transgenic Mice by the Human BCHE Coding Sequence

  • Rachel Beeri
  • Averell Gnatt
  • Yaron Lapidot-Lifsonl
  • Dalia Ginzberg
  • Moshe Shani
  • Haim Zakut
  • Hermona Soreq

Abstract

Multiple findings implicate acetylcholine with sperm functioning 1,2 and acetyl-and butyrylcholinesterase activities (ACHE, BCHE) were observed in mammalian sperm cells and during oocyte development 1–3. In vivo amplification of the human BCHE gene was first found in a father and son exposed to cholinesterase inhibitors 4, but it remained unclear whether the amplified DNA was transmitted as such from father to son or whether the amplification phenomenon re-occurred in germ cells, particularly during male meiosis or sperm differentiation.

Keywords

Transgenic Mouse Cholinesterase Inhibitor Sperm Differentiation Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Endogenous Ache 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rachel Beeri
    • 1
  • Averell Gnatt
    • 1
  • Yaron Lapidot-Lifsonl
    • 2
  • Dalia Ginzberg
    • 1
  • Moshe Shani
    • 3
  • Haim Zakut
    • 2
  • Hermona Soreq
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Biol. Chem., The Life Sciences InstThe Hebrew UnivJerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.Dept of Obs/ Gyn., The Edith Wolfson Med. Ctr., HolonThe Sackler Faculty of Med. Tel-Aviv Univ.Israel
  3. 3.Dept. of Genet. Eng.The Inst. of Animal Sci.Beit DaganIsrael

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