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Comparison of Uricase-Bound and Uricase-Loaded Erythrocytes as Bioreactors for Uric Acid Degradation

  • Mauro Magnani
  • Umberto Mancini
  • Marzia Bianchi
  • Antonio Fazi
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 326)

Abstract

Uric acid is a normal end product of purine catabolism that when it increases in blood over normal values (hyperuricemia) can contribute to a group of diseases characteristic of gout.1 Hyperuricemia can arise by several mechanisms including increased uric acid production or reduced excretion by the kidney. Several approaches have been employed to reduce serum urate levels such as dietary means, promotion of uric acid excretion, administration of uricase and inhibitors of the enzymes responsible for its synthesis.

Keywords

Uric Acid Uric Acid Concentration Uric Acid Excretion Blood Uric Acid Uric Acid Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mauro Magnani
    • 1
  • Umberto Mancini
    • 1
  • Marzia Bianchi
    • 1
  • Antonio Fazi
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Chimica Biologica “Giorgio Fornaini”Università di UrbinoUrbinoItaly

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