Schizotypal, Schizoid, Paranoid, and Avoidant Personality Disorders

  • Susan K. Thompson-Pope
  • Ira D. Turkat

Abstract

Personality disorders are considered highly prevalent in both outpatient and residential settings. In addition, there has been a proliferation of interest in the personality disorders in the past 10 years, primarily as a function of the publication of DSM-III (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1980). Despite this, the literature remains replete with controversy. For example, there is considerable difficulty with achieving acceptable levels of reliability as a result of overlap in diagnostic criteria across the personality disorder categories. Further, disputes concerning the relationship between Axis I and Axis II disorders of the current diagnostic code are also common.

Keywords

Placebo Depression Dementia Schizophrenia Diazepam 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan K. Thompson-Pope
    • 1
  • Ira D. Turkat
    • 2
  1. 1.Broughton HospitalMorgantonUSA
  2. 2.Venice Hospital and University of Florida College of MedicineVeniceUSA

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