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A Comparison of the Dose-Rbe and the Biological Dosimetry Approaches for Treatment Planning in Bnct

  • B. H. Laster
  • H. B. Liu
  • C. R. Gordon
  • V. P. Bond

Abstract

Treatment planning for clinical trials with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is complicated substantially by the fact that the radiation field generated by the activating external neutron beam is composed of several different types of radiation, i.e., fast neutrons, recoil protons from elastic collisions with hydrogen, gamma rays from the reactor and from neutron capture by body hydrogen, protons from nitrogen capture, and the products of the NCT interaction. Furthermore, the relative contribution of each type of radiation varies with depth in tissue. Because each of these radiations has its own RBE, and the RBE of the fast neutron component will not be constant as the neutron spectrum changes with depth, the problem of predicting the severity of the biological effect, in depth, becomes complex indeed.

Keywords

Boric Acid Fast Neutron Neutron Beam Neutron Capture Boron Neutron Capture Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. H. Laster
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. B. Liu
    • 1
  • C. R. Gordon
    • 1
  • V. P. Bond
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical DepartmentBrookhaven National Laboratory UptonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Radiation OncologyUniversity Hospital Stony BrookUSA

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