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Non-Cochlear Projections to the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus: Are they Mainly Inhibitory?

  • Richard L. Saint Marie
  • E.-Michael Ostapoff
  • Christina G. Benson
  • D. Kent Morest
  • Steven J. Potashner
Part of the NATO ASI series book series (NSSA, volume 239)

Abstract

Non-cochlear synapses in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), originate from a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic sources. It has been suggested by some studies that these synapses may actually outnumber those of the primary afferents in some regions of the VCN. In this chapter we will review the evidence that most non-cochlear synapses may be inhibitory, examine their distribution on different cell types in the VCN, and attempt to identify their origins.

Keywords

Stellate Cell Inferior Colliculus Cochlear Nucleus Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Ventral Cochlear Nucleus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard L. Saint Marie
    • 1
  • E.-Michael Ostapoff
    • 1
  • Christina G. Benson
    • 1
  • D. Kent Morest
    • 1
  • Steven J. Potashner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy and Center for Neurological SciencesUniversity of Connecticut Health CenterFarmingtonUSA

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