Morphological and Functional Differences Between HLA-DR+ Peripheral Blood Dendritic Cells and HLA-DR+ FN-Alpha Producing Cells

  • Stuart E Starr
  • Santu Bandyopadhyay
  • Vedapuri Shanmugam
  • Nassef Hassan
  • Steven Douglas
  • Stephanie J. Jackson
  • Jihed Chehimi
  • Giorgio Trinchieri
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 329)

Abstract

Several cell types, including B cells, NK cells, and monocytes have been proposed to be the cells responsible for IFN-α production in-vitro in response to herpesviruses and other viruses. When Perussia et al1 described IFN-α producing cells as HLA-DR+ nonadherent, non-monocyte, non-B peripheral blood cells, dendritic cells (DC) became an attractive candidate cells for this function. Subsequently, Bandyopadhyay et al2,3 showed that the major leukocyte subset in human peripheral blood responsible for IFN-α production upon culture with herpesvirus-infected target cells consists of nonadherent HLA-DR+ cells, which bear no surface markers of B, or T cells, monocytes or NK cells and that these cells also serve as accessory cells for NK cell-mediated lysis of the herpesvirus and HIV-infected targets. Later, Chehimi et al4 reported that human peripheral blood mononuclear cells contain at least two distinct HLA-DR+ cell subsets, both of which lack any B and T cell, monocyte and NK cell surface markers. One HLA-DR+ cell subset is plastic nonadherent, produces IFN-α in response to herpesvirus and HIV and provides accessory help to NK cells for lysis of virus-infected targets, but does not induce mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR). The other population has the morphology of dendritic cells (DC), is loosely adherent to plastic, stimulates T cells in the MLR, but neither produces IFN-α when exposed to virus-infected targets nor provides accessory help to NK cells. In this report, we show for the first time morphological, as well as new functional differences, between HLA-DR+ IFN-α producing cells (IPC) and HLA-DR+ DC.

Keywords

Hepatitis Titration Sarcoma Interferon Sorting 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    B. Perussia, V. Fanning, and G. Trinchieri, A leukocyte subset bearing HLA-DR antigen is responsible for in vitro interferon-alpha production in response to viruses, Nat Immun Cell Growth Regulation. 4: 120 (1985).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    S. Bandyopadhyay, B. Perussia, G. Trinchieri, D. S. Miller, and S. E. Starr, Requirement for HLA-DR+ accessory cells in natural killing of cytomegalovirus-infected fibroblasts, J Exp Med. 164: 180 (1986).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    S. Bandyopadhyay, S. H. Ho, J. Chehimi, U. Ziegner, D. S. Miller, J. A. Hoxie, and S. E. Starr, Natural killer cell-mediated lysis of target cells infected with cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency virus, in “Natural killer cells and host defense”, E. W Ades, C. Lopez, eds., S. Karger, Basel (1989).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. Chehimi, S. E. Starr, H. Kawashima, D. S. Miller, G. Trinchieri, B. Perussia, and S. Bandyopadhyay, Dendritic cells and IFN-alpha-producing cells are two functionally distinct non-B, non-monocytic HLA-DR+ cell subsets in human peripheral blood, Immunology. 68: 486 (1989).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    S. C. Knight, J. Farrant, A. Bryant, A. J. Edwards, S. Burman, A. Lever, J. Clark, and A. D. B. Webster, Non-adherent, low-density cells from human peripheral blood contain dendritic cells and monocytes, both with veiled morphology, Immunology. 57: 595 (1986).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    M. Murphy, R. Loudon, M. Kobayashi, and G. Trinchieri, Gamma interferon and lymphotoxin, released by activated T cells, synergyze to inhibit granulocyte-monocyte colony formation, J Exp Med. 164: 263 (1986).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    J. Chehimi, S. E. Starr, I. Frank, M. Rengaraju, S. J. Jackson, C. Llanes, M. Kobayashi, B. Perussia, D. Young, E. Nickbarg, S. F. Wolf, and G. Trinchieri, Natural killer (NK) cell stimulatory factor increases the cytotoxic activity of NK cells from both healthy donors and human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, J Exp Med. 175: 789 (1992).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    J. Chehimi, S. Bandyopadhyay, K. Prakash, B. Perussia, N. F. Hassan, H. Kawashima, D. Campbell, J. Kornbluth, and S. E. Starr, In-vitro infection of natural killer cells with different immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates, J Virol. 65: 1812 (1991).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    L. J. Eales, J. Farrant, M. Helbert, and A. J. Pinching, Peripheral blood dendritic cells in persons with AIDS and AIDS-related complex: loss of high intensity class II antigen expression and function, Clin Exp Immunol. 71: 425 (1988).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    S. E. Macatonia, R. Lau, S. Patterson, A. J. Pinching, and S. C. Knight, Dendritic cell infection, depletion and dysfunction in HIV-infected individuals, Immunology. 71: 38 (1990).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart E Starr
    • 1
  • Santu Bandyopadhyay
    • 1
  • Vedapuri Shanmugam
    • 1
  • Nassef Hassan
    • 1
  • Steven Douglas
    • 1
  • Stephanie J. Jackson
    • 1
  • Jihed Chehimi
    • 1
  • Giorgio Trinchieri
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Infectious Diseases and ImmunologyThe Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology PhiladelphiaPennsylvaniaUSA

Personalised recommendations