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Produced Water pp 535-547 | Cite as

Use of Solar Ponds to Reclaim Salt Products from Brine Waters from Oil and Gas Well Operations in New York

  • J. F. Atkinson
  • M. R. Matsumoto
  • M. D. Bunn
  • D. S. Hodge
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 46)

Abstract

New York State is a relatively minor producer of oil and gas. Presently, there are approximately 4,300 active gas wells and 4,600 oil wells owned by about 600 operators in New York State. The majority of active oil wells are in Allegany and Cattaraugus Counties, and the majority of active gas wells are in Chautauqua County. In 1990, 0.42 million barrels of crude oil and 25,400 million cubic feet of natural gas were produced (DEC, 1990). Current annual brine generation rates, estimated by the New York State Division of Mineral Resources (DMN), are about 300,000 barrels (12.6 million gallons) from gas production and about 2.1 million barrels (88.2 million gallons) from oil production.

Keywords

Injection Well Reclamation Facility Solar Pond Surface Water Discharge Geothermal Brine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. Atkinson
    • 1
  • M. R. Matsumoto
    • 1
  • M. D. Bunn
    • 2
  • D. S. Hodge
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Marketing Department, School of ManagementState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA
  3. 3.Department of GeologyState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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