The Case of Oppositional Cooperation

  • Phillip A. Phelps
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Problems of behavior or conduct in school-age children are quite common in both mental health and medical settings. Specific presenting problems often include defiant behavior, temper tantrums, hitting siblings and/or parents, impulsivity, short attention span, and other socially frowned-upon actions. Children exhibiting these behaviors are typically assigned diagnoses in the American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Revised Edition (1987) such as Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder or Oppositional/ Defiant Disorder.

Keywords

Burner Fatigue Depression Assure Expense 

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References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (1987). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed.-revised). Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phillip A. Phelps
    • 1
  1. 1.Child Development UnitChildren’s Hospital of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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