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Status of the Genetic Resources of Pacific Rim Salmon

  • A. J. Gharrett
  • B. E. Riddell
  • J. E. Seeb
  • J. H. Helle
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 248)

Abstract

Although there are numerous serious threats to the persistence of individual wild pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), chum (O. keta), sockeye (O. nerka), coho (O. kisutch), and chinook (O. tshawytscha) salmon populations in their native range, these species as a whole are relatively healthy compared to other salmonids reviewed in this text.

Keywords

Chum Salmon Chinook Salmon Coho Salmon Sockeye Salmon Pink Salmon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Gharrett
    • 1
  • B. E. Riddell
    • 2
  • J. E. Seeb
    • 3
  • J. H. Helle
    • 4
  1. 1.Juneau Center, School of Fisheries and Ocean SciencesUniversity of Alaska FairbanksJuneauUSA
  2. 2.Department of Fisheries and OceansPacific Biological StationNanaimoCanada
  3. 3.Fisheries Rehabilitation, Enhancement and Development DivisionAlaska Department of Fish and GameAnchorageUSA
  4. 4.Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Auke Bay LaboratoryNational Marine Fisheries ServiceAuke BayUSA

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