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Mucosal Immunity: The Role of Secretory Immunoglobulin a in Protection Against the Invasive Pathogen Salmonella typhimurium

  • James M. Slauch
  • Michael J. Mahan
  • Pierre Michetti
  • Marian R. Neutra
  • John J. Mekalanos
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 245)

Abstract

Many pathogens gain entry into a host organism by crossing the epithelia of the digestive, respiratory or genital tracts. The main defense against this entry is the mucosal immune system. In the gut mucosa, antigen sampling sites contain organized mucosal lymphoid tissue including lymphoid follicles. These cellular assemblies, which form large aggregates in Peyer’s patches, sample lumenal antigens, resulting in the stimulation of both T cells and B lymphoblasts, committed to IgA synthesis. This leads to the production of secretory antibodies of the IgA isotype. Secretory IgA (slgA) antibodies are thought to act by immune exclusion. That is, slgA prevents the pathogen from contacting the mucosal surface by agglutination, entrapment of immune complexes in the mucus, and clearance by peristalsis (Brandtzaeg, 1989; Childers, et al., 1989; Mestecky, 1988).

Keywords

Insertion Mutation Oral Challenge Mucosal Immune Response Mucosal Lymphoid Tissue Sal4 Antigen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Slauch
    • 1
  • Michael J. Mahan
    • 1
  • Pierre Michetti
    • 2
    • 3
  • Marian R. Neutra
    • 2
  • John J. Mekalanos
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular GeneticsHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.GI Cell Biology Laboratory, Children’s Hospital, and Department of PediatricsHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Division of GastroenterologyChuvChuv-LausanneSwitzerland

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