NSL Neural Simulation Language

  • Alfredo Weitzenfeld
  • Michael A. Arbib
Part of the The Kluwer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 254)

Abstract

NSL, Neural Simulation Language, is a general purpose neural network simulation language and development system. NSL includes a high level language for describing neural networks, an interactive command interpreter, and powerful visualization tools. The simulator is designed and implemented using object-oriented programming methodologies. NSL provides a simulation platform for different types of applications, including both biological and artificial neural network based models, some of which are presented here. Presently, a number of research sites are involved in the development of new NSL based models, as well as in the extension and development of new libraries. The close interaction between these sites, together with the utilization of the system for teaching purposes, has provided a key part in the evolution of the system.

Keywords

Retina Convolution Encapsulation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfredo Weitzenfeld
    • 1
  • Michael A. Arbib
    • 1
  1. 1.Brain Simulation Laboratory, Center for Neural EngineeringUniversity of Southern California

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