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Automatic Language Identification Using Telephone Speech

  • Yeshwant K. Muthusamy
  • Ronald A. Cole

Abstract

Automatic language identification is the problem of identifying the language being spoken from a sample of speech by an unknown speaker. Within seconds of hearing speech, people are able to determine whether it is a language they know. If it is a language with which they are not familiar, they often can make subjective judgments as to its similarity to a language they know, e.g., “sounds like German”.

Keywords

Language Identification Proceeding IEEE Prosodic Feature Speech Corpus Tonal Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yeshwant K. Muthusamy
    • 1
  • Ronald A. Cole
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Spoken Language UnderstandingOregon Graduate Institute of Science and TechnologyUSA

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