Automatic Language Identification Using Telephone Speech

  • Yeshwant K. Muthusamy
  • Ronald A. Cole

Abstract

Automatic language identification is the problem of identifying the language being spoken from a sample of speech by an unknown speaker. Within seconds of hearing speech, people are able to determine whether it is a language they know. If it is a language with which they are not familiar, they often can make subjective judgments as to its similarity to a language they know, e.g., “sounds like German”.

Keywords

Fatigue Beach Acoustics Mora 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yeshwant K. Muthusamy
    • 1
  • Ronald A. Cole
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Spoken Language UnderstandingOregon Graduate Institute of Science and TechnologyUSA

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