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Sucrose pp 223-247 | Cite as

Technological value of sucrose in food products

  • M. A. Clarke

Abstract

The technological value of sucrose in food products is the value of sucrose as a component in foods and food products that results from the unique combination of physical and chemical, including sensory, properties found in the sucrose molecule: common table sugar. In this chapter, production and consumption figures on sucrose will be presented; utilization amounts in food categories and beverages will be outlined. Subsequent sections will detail and describe the physical and chemical properties of sucrose that, in their unusual multiplicity and strength, combine to give sucrose its versatility as a universal sweetener.

Keywords

Itaconic Acid Cane Sugar Cane Juice High Fructose Corn Syrup Dextrose Equivalent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

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  • M. A. Clarke

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