Wheat pp 154-168 | Cite as

Soft wheat quality in production of cookies and crackers

  • H. Faridi
  • C. Gaines
  • P. Finney

Abstract

Of the five principal classes of wheat grown in the United States, soft red winter, soft white winter and spring, as well as soft white winter club are the wheats mainly used in production of cookies and crackers (Figure 11.1). The terms ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ as applied to wheats are descriptions of the texture of the wheat kernel. Flour obtained from a hard wheat kernel has a coarser particle size than does flour obtained from a soft wheat kernel. The number of types of products made from soft wheat is large. A partial list is shown in Table 11.1. All of the listed products have better appearance and eating quality when made from soft rather than hard wheat flour. Low-protein (7–10%) flours milled from soft wheats are most suitable for making cakes and biscuits.1

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Faridi
  • C. Gaines
  • P. Finney

There are no affiliations available

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