Hide and tanning waste by-products

  • A. R. Y. El Boushy
  • A. F. B. van der Poel
Chapter

Abstract

During the production of leather several waste by-products are produced which may cause pollution unless they are used as a feedstuff. The yearly world production of fresh hides (cattle, buffalo, sheep and goat) is estimated to be 8–9 million tonnes per year (FAO, 1990). During the processing of these hides, the waste production is estimated to be 1.4 million tonnes per year.

Keywords

Maize Dust Sulphide Zirconium Arsenic 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. R. Y. El Boushy
    • 1
  • A. F. B. van der Poel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Animal NutritionWageningen Agricultural UniversityThe Netherlands

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