NO Mimics O2 in the Carotid Body Chemoreception

  • Masao Katayama
  • Deepak K. Chugh
  • Anil Mokashi
  • Dilip K. Ray
  • Donald E. Bebout
  • Sukhamay Lahiri
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 360)

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO) by virtue of its chemical binding with biological heme compounds in competition with O2 (Martin et al., 1986), can mimic carotid body responses to PO2 changes. That NO is produced endogenously (Palmeret al., 1987) and that its application dilates blood vessels and improved coronary blood flow have long been known (Amezcua et al., 1989). More recently nitric oxide synthase (NOS) which generates NO from L-arginine has been localized in many tissues including blood vessels (Moncada et al., 1991), peripheral nerves (Gillespie et al., 1990) neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and ganglia (Ross et al., 1990; Garthwaite, 1990; Bredt et al., 1990). The consensus is that the mechanism of effects of NO is due to its reaction with soluble guanylate cyclase, a heme compound, and an increased production of cGMP which mediates the physiological responses (Bredt & Snyder, 1992)

Keywords

Dopamine Pentobarbital Anil Nitroprusside 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masao Katayama
    • 1
  • Deepak K. Chugh
    • 1
  • Anil Mokashi
    • 1
  • Dilip K. Ray
    • 1
  • Donald E. Bebout
    • 1
  • Sukhamay Lahiri
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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