Mo Compounds Aerogel Catalyst and its Metharation Activity

  • Chi-Ming Zhang
  • Song-Ying Chen
  • Zhen-Ping Yang
  • Shao-Yi Peng
Chapter

Abstract

Aerogel provides a unique very highly divided materials that can find more important applications in the ever growing domain of catalysis. They can be a component in solid superacid catalysts as Yamaguchi recently pointed out1. In particular, metal — on supported catalysts prepared under this form are very attractive since the sol — gel step permits one “to pour the metal out as a thin film or in any shape that is wanted” accord to Droege2. At the macro — scopic level, aerogels present a monodisperse distribution of particle dimensions which can be reorganized into “dynamic” cluster which are then easily fluidized so that their uses in real conditions are now envisaged and not only restricted at the laboratory scale. At the microscopic level, the mixed aerogels of their parent gels represent very homogeneous combinations originating from chemical interactions at the molecular scale in the liquid phase (or dispersed in a liquid phase) that can be viewed as “frozen” at the solid state. Aerogels are, in this respect, a sort of a three dimensional dry picture of the sol — gel product with all their catalytic potentialities intact and available for revelations. Catalysis continues as a major industrial application for molybdenum. A few researchers investigated the characterization of the catalyst diameter to determine the genesis and properties of the active sites. because it is too difficult to prepare sol — gel product on Mo compounds aerogel from (NH4)6Mo7O24 3. In this paper, we will discuss the Mo compound aerogel and its methanation.

Keywords

Methanation Catalysis Molybdenum MoS2 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chi-Ming Zhang
    • 1
  • Song-Ying Chen
    • 1
  • Zhen-Ping Yang
    • 1
  • Shao-Yi Peng
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Coal Chemistry Chinese Academy of Sciences TaiyuanState Key Laboratory of Coal ConversionP. R. China

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