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Vectorial Oxalate Transport Across a Monolayer of Renal Epithelial Cells (LLC-PK1)

  • H. Koul
  • M. Yanagawa
  • L. Renzulli
  • M. Menon
  • C. Scheid

Abstract

Studies on erythrocytes from stone forming patients1 and on renal papillary cells from stone forming rats2 demonstrated abnormally high rates of oxalate transport, and it has been suggested that increased oxalate uptake plays an important role in urolithiasis. Understanding how a change in oxalate uptake affects oxalate excretion is difficult, however, because information on renal oxalate handling is limited. Available data from micropuncture studies indicate that oxalate undergoes both reabsorption and secretion within the kidney with net secretion occurring in the proximal tubule3. Such studies are technically quite difficult and provide only limited control of the composition of extracellular space such that it is difficult to predict the magnitude and direction of oxalate flux under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. These difficulties led us to examine vectorial oxalate flux using a simpler model system, LLC-PK1 cells. These cells retain many of the characteristics of normal renal epithelial cells and form intact monolayers that can be used for examination of vectorial transport4. Moreover, studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that these cells express different transport systems for oxalate at the luminal and abluminal membrane surfaces: a C1-/oxalate exchanger at the luminal surface and a SO4 2-(oxalate)/HCO3- exchanger at the abluminal surface. Thus, the present studies examined the magnitude and direction of vectorial oxalate flux across confluent monolayers of LLC-PK1 cells.

Keywords

Renal Epithelial Cell Vectorial Transport4 Micropuncture Study Oxalate Transport Oxalate Uptake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    B Baggio, G Gambaro, F Marchini, E Cicerello, R Tenconi, M Clementi and E Borsatti, An inheritable anomaly of red-cell oxalate transport in primary calcium nephrolithiasis correctable with diuretics, N Engl J Med 314: 599 (1986).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    D Sigmon, S Kumar, B Carpenter, M Menon and CR Scheid, Oxalate transport in renal cortical and papillary cells from normal and stone forming animals, Am J Kidney Dis 17: 376 (1991).PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    R Greger, F Lang, H Oberleithner and P Deetjen, Handling of oxalate by the rat kidney, Pflugers Arch. 374: 243 (1978).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    HF Cantiello, JA Scott and CA Rabito, Polarized distribution of the Na+/H+ exchange system in a renal cell line (LLC-PK1) with characteristics of proximal tubular cells, J Biol Chem 261: 3252 (1986).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Koul
    • 1
  • M. Yanagawa
    • 2
  • L. Renzulli
    • 1
  • M. Menon
    • 1
  • C. Scheid
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Urology and Transplantation SurgeryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of UrologyMie University School of MedicineMieJapan
  3. 3.Department of PhysiologyWorcesterUSA

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