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Urolithiasis 2 pp 613-615 | Cite as

Exaggerated Calciuric Response to an Acute Acid Load in Patients with Calcium Renal Lithiasis

  • M. Normand
  • P. Houillier
  • A. Peuchant
  • J. L. Cayotte
  • M. Paillard

Abstract

The incidence of calcium renal lithiasis is increasing in industrialized countries1, and this increase appears to be linked to modifications in food intake. Indeed, there is a strong relationship between the consumption of animal proteins and the risk of developing calcium stone2, 3. The putative lithogenic factors are a rise in calciuria, oxaluria, uricosuria, and a fall in urinary pH and citraturia4. The increase in acid load, a consequence of the metabolism of animal proteins, has been considered as the cause of enhanced calciurias. In fact, many workers have studied, both in calcium stone formers and in controls, the calciuric response to a protein-rich diet or an oral chronic acid load2, 4–7. By contrast, only few studies have dealt with the calciuretic response induced by an acute acid load. The goal of this study was therefore to address this latter point.

Keywords

Acid Load Urinary Calcium Excretion Calcium Stone Renal Stone Disease Calcium Renal Lithiasis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Normand
    • 1
  • P. Houillier
    • 2
  • A. Peuchant
    • 1
  • J. L. Cayotte
    • 1
  • M. Paillard
    • 2
  1. 1.Service de NephrologieClinique Saint-MartinPessacFrance
  2. 2.Departement de Physiologie, INSERM U 356Hôpital BroussaisParisFrance

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