Cortical Dysgenesis in Adults with Epilepsy

  • A. A. Raymond
  • M. J. Cook
  • D. R. Fish
  • S. D. Shorvon
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 264)

Abstract

Gross cortical dysgenesis (CD) is a well-recognised cause of epilepsy. Affected patients present with epilepsy in infancy or early childhood, are often severely mentally handicapped, and more often than not exhibit bilateral motor deficits. Recently, subtle forms of CD have been identified in adults with previously designated cryptogenic epilepsy (Raymond et al., 1992, 1993). Unlike children with CD, affected adults may have normal intelligence and rarely exhibit fixed neurological signs.

Keywords

Migration Germinal Neurol Polyhydramnios Lissencephaly 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. A. Raymond
    • 1
  • M. J. Cook
    • 1
  • D. R. Fish
    • 1
  • S. D. Shorvon
    • 1
  1. 1.National Hospital for Neurology and NeurosurgeryLondonUK

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