Cryogenic System for the 45 Tesla Hybrid Magnet

  • S. W. Van Sciver
  • J. R. Miller
  • S. Welton
  • H. J. Schneider-Muntau
  • G. E. McIntosh
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 39)

Abstract

The 45 Tesla hybrid magnet system will consist of a 14 Tesla superconducting outsert magnet and a 31 Tesla water cooled insert. The magnet is planned for operation in early 1995 at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Its purpose is to provide the highest DC magnetic fields for the materials research community. The present paper discusses the overall design of the cryogenic system for the superconducting magnet. Unique features of this system include static 1.8 K pressurized He II as a coolant for the magnet and a refrigerated structural support system for load transfer during fault conditions. The system will consist of two connected cryostats. The magnet is contained within one cryostat which has a clear warm bore of 616 mm and is designed to be free of system interfaces and therefore minimize interference with the magnet user. A second supply cryostat provides the connections to the refrigeration system and magnet power supply. The magnet and supply cryostats are connected to each other through a horizontal services duct section. Issues to be discussed in the present paper include design and thermal analysis of the magnet system during cooldown and in steady state operation and overall cryogenic system design.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J. R. Miller, et. al., A design for the superconducting outsert of a 45-T hybrid magnet system using cable-in-conduit conductors, IEEE Trans. on Applied Superconductivity, 3: 71 (1993).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Y. Iwasa, M.J. Leupold, and R. J. Weggel, Hybrid III system, IEEE Trans. on Magnetics, 24: 1070 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    H. J. Schneider-Muntau and J. C.Vallier, The Grenoble hybrid magnet, IEEE Trans on Magnetics, 24: 1067 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    R. Maekawa, H. J. Schneider-Muntau, and S. W. Van Sciver, Heat transport in cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) cooled by He II, Cryogenics 32, ICEC Supplement: 283 (1992).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    D. S. Slack, Design and development of a 10 W, 1.8 K Refrigerator for a 21 T NMR spectrometer, Adv. Cryogenic Engn., 37: 719 (1992).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. W. Van Sciver
    • 1
  • J. R. Miller
    • 1
  • S. Welton
    • 1
  • H. J. Schneider-Muntau
    • 1
  • G. E. McIntosh
    • 2
  1. 1.National High Magnetic Field LaboratoryTallahasseeUSA
  2. 2.Cryogenic Technical Services, Inc.BoulderUSA

Personalised recommendations