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Alcohol

  • Robert M. AndersonJr.
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Alcohol may have short-term effects on the CNS (intoxication and withdrawal) or long-term effects (alcoholism, alcoholic Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, and alcoholic dementia). The properties of each of these five disease states associated with alcohol use are described below.

Keywords

Alcoholic Hepatitis Retrograde Amnesia Anterograde Amnesia Alcoholic Dementia Acute Confusional State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. AndersonJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.HonoluluUSA

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