Self-Care and Independent Living

  • Robert M. AndersonJr.
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The ability of the individual to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and to live independently without supervision may be at issue in a neuropsychological evaluation. On the basis of interviews with patient, family, and staff, review of available records, behavioral observations, and test data, the neuropsychologist may need to assess the patient’s ability to care for his or her needs without assistance.

Keywords

Transportation Schizophrenia Hemiplegia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. AndersonJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.HonoluluUSA

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