In Vitro and in Vivo Comparison of Some Properties of Antigranulocyte Antibodies

  • J.Th. Locher
  • K. Seybold
  • P. H. Hasler
  • P. Bläuenstein
  • P. A. Schubiger
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 262)

Abstract

Our experience with the immunoscintigraphy of infection exceed 600 cases. In 1985 we started with an 1231 labeled compound, the anti- CEA antibody Mab-47, which binds to granulocytes in a very specific manner (Locher 1985). It was, thereafter, an useful tool to detect hidden infections either by conventional scintigraphy or by SPET. But, the unsatisfactory supply with 1231 should be eliminated by developing the 99mTc labeled Mab 47. We tried several prototypes of 99mTc- kits, from which one was clinically tested. This compound consists of a derivative of Mab- 47, namely a tetraaza ligand coupled with a carboxylate bound to the free amines of Mab 47 and tin tartrate. This kit seemed to be very handy for clinical use (because the labeling was performed in a one-step process only). After the addition of pertechnetate and a single filtration process to eliminate colloidal 99mTc byproducts this agent was ready for injection. The product had identical biokinetical properties as the iodinated form, but, unfortunately, was not stable enough for routine preparations. We found, that the coupling of the ligand to the antibody needed an optimal amount of ligands, which was difficult to get in a water medium without damaging the antibody. It is well known, that in the meantime the BW 250/183, another 99mTc-labelled Mab from Behring, became commercially available and very successful (Joseph 1987). Here the labeling is performed by the Schwarz method, a two step procedure, which works very good for complete (and therefore relatively large) antibody molecules.

Keywords

HPLC Filtration Carboxylate Iodide Halflife 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J.Th. Locher
    • 1
  • K. Seybold
    • 1
  • P. H. Hasler
    • 2
  • P. Bläuenstein
    • 2
  • P. A. Schubiger
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear MedicineKantonsspital, AarauSwitzerland
  2. 2.Radiopharmaca DivisionPSIVilligen-PSISwitzerland

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