Population and Delivery Systems: Variability in Pharmacokevettcs of Long-Acting Injectable Contraceptives

  • Josue Garza-Flores
  • Sang Guo-Wei
  • Peter E. Hall
Chapter
Part of the Reproductive Biology book series (RBIO)

Abstract

Following the development and widespread use of oral hormonal contraceptives, it became evident that long-acting formulations of hormonal contraceptives could provide additional contraceptive options in some cultural settings where injectable or subdermal routes of administration are preferred. Despite a somewhat controversial history, longacting contraceptives presently constitute an important option in family planning services1. Indeed, more than seven million women around the world are currently using long-acting injectable and implantable steroidal contraceptives, mostly in developing countries, and the number of users is increasing2.

Keywords

Obesity Estrogen Progesterone Estradiol Valerate 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Josue Garza-Flores
    • 1
  • Sang Guo-Wei
    • 1
  • Peter E. Hall
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Biologiá de la ReproductiónInstituto Nacional de la Nutrición S.Z.México, D.F.Mexico

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