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Improvement of Barley and Wheat Quality by Genetic Engineering

  • P. R. Shewry
  • A. S. Tatham
  • N. G. Halford
  • J. Davies
  • N. Harris
  • M. Kreis

Abstract

Although the mature cereal grain consists predominately of starch with only about 10–15% of protein, it is the protein fraction which is largely responsible for quality. In the case of wheat the quality for breadmaking, for other baked goods (biscuits, wafers, cakes and pastries) and for noodles and pasta is determined by the gluten protein fraction, while the nutritional quality of barley and wheat for monogastric livestock is limited by the low contents of essential amino acids in the prolamin storage proteins. In the case of malting barley the quality is determined not only by the proteins that accumulate during grain development but also by enzymes synthesised de novo during germination. In the present paper we will briefly review our studies of grain quality in barley and wheat, and speculate how quality parameters can be manipulated by genetic engineering.

Keywords

Gluten Protein Glutenin Subunit Glutenin High Molecular Weight Subunit Repetitive Domain Wheat Quality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. R. Shewry
    • 1
  • A. S. Tatham
    • 1
  • N. G. Halford
    • 1
  • J. Davies
    • 2
  • N. Harris
    • 2
  • M. Kreis
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural Sciences AFRC Institute of Arable Crops ResearchUniversity of Bristol Long Ashton Research StationLong Ashton, BristolUK
  2. 2.Durham University Department of BotanyUniversity of Durham Science LaboratoriesDurhamUK
  3. 3.Biologie du Developpement des PlantesUniversité de Paris-SudOrsay CedexFrance

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