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Diamond Detectors for the SSC

  • K. K. Gan
  • H. Kagan
  • R. Kass
  • R. Malchow
  • W. Palmer
  • C. White
  • S. Zhao
  • L. S. Pan
  • S. Han
  • D. Kania
  • M. Lee
  • S. Kim
  • F. Sannes
  • S. Schnetzer
  • R. Stone
  • G. Thomson
  • Y. Sugimoto
  • A. Fry
  • S. Kanda
  • S. Olsen

Abstract

Diamond is well suited as a particle detector in the high rate and high radiation environment of the SSC. The use of diamond is made possible by recent developments in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth process. CVD diamonds have been studied using radioactive sources and test beams. The measured charge collection distance of CVD diamonds now exceeds that of natural diamond. No degradation of signal is observed up to a rate of 104 particles cm-2s-1. Exposure to stopping 5 MeV α particles shows no radiation damage with a dose of up to 1013 particles cm-2. Prototype diamond/tungsten and silicon/tungsten calorimeters have been constructed and tested in an electron beam at KEK. The energy resolution of the diamond/tungsten detector is comparable to the silicon/tungsten calorimeter.

Keywords

Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Film Pulse Height Radioactive Source Test Beam 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    CVD diamond films used for this study were fabricated by Norton Diamond Films and Crystallume Inc.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    L. S. Pan et al., to be published by J. Appl. Phys. (1993).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    S. Zhao, Ph.D. Thesis, The Ohio State University (1993).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    T. Taniguchi, Y. Fukushima, and Y. Yoribayashi, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-36, 657 (1989).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    M. Franklin et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A315, 39 (1992).ADSGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    The signal was recorded using a photoconductivity technique: e-h pairs were created by illuminating with a UV laser on a 1 mm space between two electrodes sputtered on the same side of the diamond.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. K. Gan
    • 1
  • H. Kagan
    • 1
  • R. Kass
    • 1
  • R. Malchow
    • 1
  • W. Palmer
    • 1
  • C. White
    • 1
  • S. Zhao
    • 1
  • L. S. Pan
    • 2
  • S. Han
    • 2
  • D. Kania
    • 2
  • M. Lee
    • 3
  • S. Kim
    • 3
  • F. Sannes
    • 3
  • S. Schnetzer
    • 3
  • R. Stone
    • 3
  • G. Thomson
    • 3
  • Y. Sugimoto
    • 4
  • A. Fry
    • 5
  • S. Kanda
    • 6
  • S. Olsen
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Laser DivisionLawrence Livermore National LaboratoryLivermoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of PhysicsRutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA
  4. 4.KEK National LaboratoryTsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-kenJapan
  5. 5.Physics DivisionSuperconducting Super Collider LaboratoryDallasUSA
  6. 6.Department of PhysicsUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA

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