A Study of Structural Integrity of the SSC Magnet Six-Strut Support System

  • C. J. Chang
  • S. Chen
  • A. Jalloh
  • D. M. Martin

Abstract

In the preliminary SSC design configuration, the overall magnet cryostat assembly is supported externally at three mechanical positioning points by two stands attached to the collider tunnel floor. Differing from the SSC design concept, a well designed and simply operated six-strut support system has been used at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/Advanced Light Source (LBL/ALS) successfully.1 In brief, the struts are equipped with ball joints at each end, and the struts are so arranged in a manner of three vertical, two lateral, and one longitudinal directions that provide the minimum constraints necessary to support the ALS system in the accelerator tunnel. Because the struts are made of differential screws which are adjustable in length, the six-strut system also provides minute controllability for cryostat alignment purposes. Also, the six-strut support system keeps the magnet from direct exposure to the accelerator tunnel floor which may lower the potential risks for the magnet from the ambient vibration and ground motion.2 Because of the mentioned merits, the six-strut support configuration is being considered as an alternative to the SSC magnet support system.

Keywords

Adapter 

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References

  1. 1.
    T. Lauritzen, SSC Laboratory six strut support system talk, November 12, 1991, presented at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory, Dallas, Texas.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. A. Manning, and R. B. Burdick, Dynamic Analysis of a Six Strut System, June 19, 1992, presented at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory, Dallas, Texas.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. J. Chang
    • 1
  • S. Chen
    • 1
  • A. Jalloh
    • 1
  • D. M. Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Magnet Systems DivisionSuperconducting Super Collider LaboratoryDallasUSA

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