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Conductor Design for The GEM Detector Magnet

  • J. V. Minervini
  • P. G. Marston
  • B. A. Smith
  • R. J. Camille
  • Z. S. Piek
  • R. F. Vieira
  • P. Titus
  • G. Deis
  • N. Martovetsky
  • P. J. Reardon
  • R. Stroynowski

Abstract

The Gammas, Electrons, Muons (GEM) Detector, one of the two large detectors planned to be built at the SSC, features high muon momentum resolution. This is achieved by magnetization (by a huge magnet, about 20 m in diameter and 31 m long) of roughly 10,000 m3 of space within the muon chambers. The GEM Detector Magnet1 should be designed to operate with highest possible reliability level to ensure maximum availability of the Detector Systems. That means that the magnet and the conductor should be as stable as practically possible. The conductor should be reliably protected against overheating and electrical breakdown in the case of a quench or fast discharge. For reliability reasons, the magnet dump voltage is relatively low, 500 V to ground, which implies low current density in the conductor. Table 1 lists general requirements for the conductor.

Keywords

Conductor Option Muon Chamber Conductor Length Test Coil Twist Pitch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. V. Minervini
    • 1
  • P. G. Marston
    • 1
  • B. A. Smith
    • 1
  • R. J. Camille
    • 1
  • Z. S. Piek
    • 1
  • R. F. Vieira
    • 1
  • P. Titus
    • 1
  • G. Deis
    • 2
  • N. Martovetsky
    • 2
  • P. J. Reardon
    • 2
  • R. Stroynowski
    • 3
  1. 1.MIT Plasma Fusion CenterCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.SSC LaboratoryDallasUSA
  3. 3.Southern Methodist UniversityDallasUSA

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