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Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca in HIV-1 Infected Female Patients

  • John A. Lucca
  • John S. Kung
  • R. Linsy Farris
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 350)

Abstract

AIDS is caused by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) presently affecting over 1.5 million people in the United States. While affecting less than 1% of the general population, keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) occurs in greater than 20% of males infected with HIV.1 In our preliminary survey of HIV infected females, we found 17% had clinical signs and symptoms compatible with KCS.2

Keywords

Generalize Lymphadenopathy Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca Persistent Generalize Lymphadenopathy Scientific Research Society Farris Department 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    J.A. Lucca, R.L Farris, L Bielory, and A.R. Capto, Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca in male patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type I, Ophthalmology 97:1008, 1990.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    J.A. Lucca and R.L Farris, Keratoconjunctivitis sicca in HIV-positive female individuals, Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 33 (suppl):1288,1992.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Public Health Service Coolfront Report, PHS plan for prevention and control of AIDS. Pub. Health Rep. 101:341, 1986.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Lucca
    • 1
  • John S. Kung
    • 1
  • R. Linsy Farris
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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