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Protein Secretion and the Identification of Neurotransmitters in the Isolated Pig Lacrimal Gland

  • Jaipaul Singh
  • Ernest Adeghate
  • Shuna Burrows
  • Frank C. Howarth
  • Tibor Donath
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 350)

Abstract

The lacrimal gland is innervated with autonomic nerves which regulate protein secretion (Bothelho, 1964; Bromberg, 1981). Immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated the distribution of adrenergic, cholinergic and peptidergic nerves in the lacrimal of several animal species (Dartt et al, 1984; Ehinger, 1964; Lunberg et al, 1980). The known putative neurotransmitters released by these nerves include acetylcholine (ACh), noradrenaline (NA), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Substance P. Exogenous application of some of these putative neurotransmitters can stimulate protein secretion (Dartt et al, 1984; Hussain and Singh, 1988; Dartt, 1989) and exert vasodilatory effects in the lacrimal (Lunberg et al, 1980). However, studies involving protein secretion and the distribution of peptidergic and aminergic nerves in the pig lacrimal gland has long been neglected despite its similarity to human. This study investigates the effects of exogenous application of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), dopamine, VIP and NPY on total protein output and the distribution of nerve fibres containing neuropeptides including NPY, VIP and amines such as 5-HT and dopamine in the isolated pig lacrimal gland.

Keywords

Acinar Cell Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Lacrimal Gland Immunoreactive Nerve Dopamine Beta Hydroxylase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaipaul Singh
    • 2
  • Ernest Adeghate
    • 1
  • Shuna Burrows
    • 2
  • Frank C. Howarth
    • 2
  • Tibor Donath
    • 1
  1. 1.1st Department of AnatomySemmelweiss University Medical SchoolBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Cell Communication Group, Department of Applied BiologyUniversity of Central LancashirePrestonEngland

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