Ethological Contributions

  • J. Dee Higley
  • Markku Linnoila
  • Stephen J. Suomi

Abstract

Developing the capacity to inhibit and express aggression in a socially acceptable fashion is crucial for normative social functioning and the acquisition of social competence. It is clear that individuals differ vastly in their capacity to exhibit and inhibit aggression, yet little is known concerning both the underlying etiology of inappropriate aggressiveness and the long-term outcomes of individuals who inappropriately express aggression early in life. Evidence is now emerging that shows excessive aggressiveness in human children to be a risk factor for increased aggressivity in adulthood (Eron, 1987; Huesmann, Eron, Lefkowitz, & Walder, 1984) Such longitudinal studies in humans are crucial to our understanding of etiological mechanisms producing abnormalities in the regulation of aggressive impulses and competent use of aggression. Longitudinal studies of human children, however, take decades to complete, and studies that control for both genetic backgrounds and exposure to environmental stimuli are extremely difficult if not impossible to conduct.

Keywords

Migration Depression Dopamine Lactate Cage 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Dee Higley
    • 1
  • Markku Linnoila
    • 1
  • Stephen J. Suomi
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Clinical Studies, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological ResearchNational Institute of Alcohol Abuse and AlcoholismPoolesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Comparative EthologyNational Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentPoolesvilleUSA

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