Abstract

Gellan gum is the generic name for the extracellular Polysaccharide elaborated by the bacterium Sphingomonas elodea (Pollock, 1993), formerly known as Pseudomonas elodea. Considered a ‘natural food additive’ in Japan since 1988 and approved in foods in a number of countries, it is being used increasingly in a variety of food products. The Polysaccharide, which can be produced in a substituted or unsubstituted form, produces gels at low concentration. These are normally formed by cooling hot solutions of the gum, but useful gels can also be obtained by allowing cations to diffuse into cold solutions. The substituted form of the gum produces soft, elastic gels, whereas the unsubstituted form produces hard, brittle gels.

Keywords

Sugar Sucrose Fermentation Hydration Agar 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Gibson
  • G. R. Sanderson

There are no affiliations available

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