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Interactive packaging involving sachet technology

Chapter

Abstract

Over the past decade, there has been a tremendous growth in interactive packaging for shelf-life extension of food. Packaging can be defined as ‘interactive’ when it ‘performs some role in the preservation of the food other than providing an inert barrier to outside influences’ (Rooney, 1992). There are many examples of interactive packaging technologies including antimicrobial and antioxidant films, ethylene absorbing sachets and temperature control indicators, some of which have been discussed in previous chapters of this text. However, perhaps one of the best examples of interactive packaging, and one which fulfils the above definition in all aspects, is modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). MAP has been defined as ‘the enclosure of food products in a high gas barrier film in which the gaseous environment has been changed or modified to slow respiration rates, reduce microbiological growth and retard enzymatic spoilage with the intent of extending shelf-life’ (Young et al., 1988). The growth in MAP technology has resulted from advances in packaging technology, the food industry’s need for less energy-intensive forms of food preservation than drying, freezing or thermal processing, and consumer needs for convenience foods with extended shelf-life yet retaining their fresh characteristics.

Keywords

Modify Atmosphere Packaging Ethanol Vapor Bakery Product Mold Growth Packaging Film 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

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