Skip to main content

Software for data collection and processing

  • Chapter
Understanding Natural Flavors

Abstract

Future generations will without a doubt refer to the last part of the 20th century as the computer revolution. The first PCs were very simple and slow, and in those days no one would have predicted that PCs would take over most tasks from the mainframe computers. Software is the necessary tool to make computers do anything. Without the proper software the most expensive and sophisticated computer will be useless. But with the growing number of people using PCs the need for simple and ‘user friendly’ software arose. The first important change toward the user was the introduction of the Apple Macintosh (1984), which introduced the desktop metaphor. This is a so called graphical user interface (GUI). The availability of very cheap computing power, the miniaturization of computers and the introduction of GUIs has had a tremendous influence upon the way we work and upon the way we collect and handle our data. In this chapter the discussion will be limited to the application of personal computers in sensory analysis with special reference to data collection and processing.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 39.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 54.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  1. Smith, D.K. and Alexander, R.C., Fumbling the future, William Morrow, New York, 1988.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Roos, P.E., Impact of computers on sensory evaluation: past, present and future. Food Quality and Preference, 1989, 1, 165–170.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Schmid, J.P., Computerization in flavour research., Flavour Science and Technology, (eds Y. Bessière and A.F. Thomas), Wiley, New York, 1990.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Francis, I., Statistical Software; A Comparative Review, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1981.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Lehman, R.S., Statistics on the Macintosh. Byte, 1987, 207–214.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Raskin, R., Statistical software for the PC. PC Magazine, 1989, 8, 5.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Piggott, J.R., Automated data collection in sensory analysis, in Flavour of Distilled Beverages, (ed J.R. Piggott), Ellis Horwood, Chichester, 1983.

    Google Scholar 

  8. McLellan, M.R., Hoo, A.F. and Peck, V., A low-cost computerized card system for the collection of sensory data. Food Technology, 1987, 41, 68–72.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Risvik, E. and Rogers, R., Sensory analysis: a view on the use of computers. Food Quality and Preference, 1989, 1, 81–85.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Brady, P.L., Computers in sensory research. Food Technology, 1984, 38, 81–83.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Lyon, D.H., Sensory analysis by computer, Part 1., Food Manufacture, 1986, November, 40–42.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Arnott, M.L., Computerised collection and statistical analysis of descriptive sensory profiling data, in Distilled Beverage Flavour, (eds J.R. Piggott and A. Paterson), VCH Publishers, New York, 1989, pp. 65–75.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Williams, A.A. and Brain, P., The scope of the microcomputer in sensory analysis. Chemistry and Industry, 1986, 4, 118–122.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Daget, N., Voirol, E., Resenterra, P. and Cabi-Akman, R., A system of data acquisition for sensory testing: the tactile plasma screen. Nestlé Research News, 1986/1987, 211–213.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Findlay, C.J., Gulett, E.A. and Genner, D., Integrated computerized sensory analysis. Journal of Sensory Studies, 1986, 1, 307–315.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  16. Winn, R.L., Touch screen systems for sensory evaluation. Food Technology, 1988, 42, 98–100.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Actis, ISHA, BoxPostale 138, 91163 Longjumeaux Cedex, France.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Biosystèmes, 3 Rue de la Breuchillière, Dijon, France.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Compusense, 173 Woolwich Street, Suite 201, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

    Google Scholar 

  20. PSA-System, OP&P Inc., PO Box 14167, 3508 SG Utrecht, The Netherlands.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Taste, Software package for sensory analysis, Reading Scientific Services, Lord Zuckerman Research Centre, Reading, U.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Tastel, Pernod-Ricard, 120 Avenue du Marechal-Foch, 94015 Creteil Cedex, France.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Lee. W.E. III, Evaluation of time-intensity sensory responses using a personal computer. Journal of Food Science, 1985, 50, 1750–1751.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  24. Yoshida, M., A microcomputer (PC 9801/MS mouse) system to record and analyse time-intensity curves of sweetness. Chemical Senses, 1986, 11, 105–118.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Overbosch, P., A theoretical model for perceived intensity in human taste and smell as a function of time, Chemical Senses, 1986, 11, 315–329.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  26. Dijksterhuis, G.B. and Roos, P.E., Collection and Processing of Time-Intensity Data, Lecture for the Nordic Workshop, ‘Advanced Sensory Analysis HI, the Consumer in Focus’, February 1990, Aarhus, Denmark (reprint available upon request from OP&P).

    Google Scholar 

  27. Gacula, M.C. and Singh, J., Statistical Methods in Food and Consumer Research, Academic Press, New York, 1984.

    Google Scholar 

  28. Powers, J.E., Using general statistical programs to evaluate sensory data. Food Technology, 1984, 38, 74–84.

    Google Scholar 

  29. O’Mahony, M., Sensory Evaluation of Food, Marcel Dekker, New York, 1986.

    Google Scholar 

  30. Stevens, J., Applied Multivariate Statistics for the Social Sciences, Lawrence Erlbaum, New Jersey, 1986.

    Google Scholar 

  31. Piggott, J.R. (ed.), Statistical Procedures in Food Research, Elsevier, London, 1986.

    Google Scholar 

  32. MacFie, H.J.M., Data analysis in flavour research: Achievements, needs and perspectives, Flavour Science and Technology, (eds M. Martens, G.A., Dalen and H. Russwurm Jr.), Wiley, New York, 1987.

    Google Scholar 

  33. SPSS, SPSS International BV, PO Box 115, 4200 AC Gorinchem, The Netherlands.

    Google Scholar 

  34. SAS, SAS Institute GmbH, PO Box 105307 Heidelberg, West Germany.

    Google Scholar 

  35. BMDP Statistical Software, Cork Technology Park, Cork, Ireland.

    Google Scholar 

  36. Genstat, Numerical Algorithms Group Ltd., England.

    Google Scholar 

  37. Gower, J.C., Generalized Procrustes Analysis, Psychometrica, 1975, 40, 33–51.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  38. Tyssø, V., Esbensen, K. and Martens, H., UNSCRAMBLER, an interactive program for multivariate calibration and prediction, Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, 1987, 2, 239–243.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  39. Burg, E. van der, Nonlinear Canonical Correlation and some related techniques, Thesis, DSWO Press, Leiden, 1988.

    Google Scholar 

  40. Martens, H. and Naes, T., Multivariate calibration, Wiley, New York, 1989.

    Google Scholar 

  41. Burg, E. van der and Dijksterhuis, G.B., Nonlinear canonical correlation analysis of multiway data, in Multiway Data Analysis, eds R. Coppi, and S. Bolasco, North Holland, 1989.

    Google Scholar 

  42. Gifi, Nonlinear Multivariate Analysis, Wiley & Sons, New York, 1990.

    Google Scholar 

  43. Dijksterhuis, G.B. and Punter, P.H., Interpreting Generalized Procrustes ‘Analysis of Variance’ Tables, Food Quality and Preference, 1990, 2, 255–265.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  44. Gruijter, D.N.M. de, Data analysis and statistics, report of a discussion. Statistica Neerlandica, 1988, 42, 99–102.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  45. Leeuw, J. de, Models and techniques. Statistica Neerlandica, 1988, 42, 91–98.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  46. Molenaar, I.W., Formal statistics and informal data analysis, or why laziness should be discouraged. Statistica Neerlandica, 1988, 42, 83–90.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  47. Tukey, J.W., Exploratory data analysis, Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts, 1977.

    Google Scholar 

  48. Cleveland, W.S. and McGill, M.E. (eds), Dynamic Graphics for Statistics, Wadsworth & Brooks/Cole, Belmont, 1988.

    Google Scholar 

  49. Visuals, F.W Young, UNC Psychom., CB-3270 Davie Hall, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 1994 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Punter, P.H. (1994). Software for data collection and processing. In: Piggott, J.R., Paterson, A. (eds) Understanding Natural Flavors. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2143-3_7

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2143-3_7

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4613-5895-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4615-2143-3

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

Publish with us

Policies and ethics